Course Descriptions

 

Migration Policy and Advocacy Fellows 

Take 15 credits During the Fellows semester: 3 hybrid courses plus a 6 credit internship.

I. First Course (3 credits)

Choose SPAN 212 or SPAN 215 (If you do not need foreign language credits please email afp@gmu.edu and consult with the program coordinator for an alternative course)

SPAN 212: Intermediate Spanish II: Local and Global Contexts. 3 credits.

*You may substitute this course with another if necessary.

Intermediate, content-based course focused on students’ use of Spanish in community and professional contexts. Cultural topics relevant to living and working in local and global Spanish-speaking communities provide a structure for students' oral, reading and written language development in the language. Critical approaches to the study of Spanish and Spanish-language culture give students the methodological foundation for advanced courses in Spanish at the University.


SPAN 212 is a hybrid class, meeting in person on the Mason Square campus on Tuesdays and online on Thursdays.

SPAN 212

1:30 pm - 2:45 pm

T

Mason Square campus: Van Metre Hall 317

Maria Esperanza Roman Mendoza (P)

 

1:30 pm - 2:45 pm

R

ON LINE

Maria Esperanza Roman Mendoza (P)

SPAN 215: Intermediate Spanish for Heritage Speakers. 3 credits.

Builds on the linguistic resources and sociocultural knowledge of intermediate heritage speakers of Spanish as they prepare for courses at the advanced level. Students will develop their oral and written expression through regular exposure to Spanish-language texts, films, digital media, music, and visual art. Students will also cultivate their critical understanding of the significance of language and other forms of culture for Spanish-language communities. The course is designed to give students multiple opportunities for personal reflection on issues concerning language and identity. Equivalent to SPAN 202.

Recommended Prerequisite: SPAN 201 or equivalent

Taught in Spanish

SPAN 215 is a hybrid class, meeting in person on the Mason Square campus on Tuesdays and online on Thursdays.

SPAN 215

1:30 pm - 2:45 pm

T

Mason Square campus: Van Metre Hall 317

Maria Esperanza Roman Mendoza (P)

 

1:30 pm - 2:45 pm

R

ON LINE

Maria Esperanza Roman Mendoza (P

 

II. Second Course (3 credits)

SPAN 325: Moving Stories. 3 credits. 

Mason Core: Literature

Recommended Prerequisite: ENGH 101 or equivalent.

This course, taught in English,  introduces students to the issue of migration through the lens of social history and identity, introducing students to major imaginative works of literature and other media from across Latin America. In this course, “moving stories” is a heuristic for exploring the phenomenon of narrative storytelling as a vehicle of culture, one that we will use to approach stories from Latin America and the Latinx US that are literally about moving. How does the shape of narrative “move” listeners, readers and movie and TV audiences towards an understanding of social life? How can we use stories about growing up, displacement, migration, social upheaval and social change to “move” our thinking about Latin American and Latinx history and social identity?

Taught in English.

SPAN 325 is a hybrid class, meeting in person on the Mason Square campus on Tuesdays and online on Thursdays.

SPAN 325

3:00 pm - 4:15 pm

T

Mason Square campus: Van Metre Hall 322

Lisa Marie Rabin (P)

 

3:00 pm - 4:15 pm

R

ON LINE

Lisa Marie Rabin (P

 

III. Third Course: 3 credits

SOCI 395/GLOA450/GOVT 319: Immigration Policy and the Migrant Experience. 3 credits.

In this course we will survey past and present U.S. immigration policies, and examine how governmental institutions, political actors, interest groups, and socio-political processes have shaped and responded to immigration to the United States. Migration is an international phenomenon; the course will focus primarily on the United States and the global trends that create the context for immigration policy. We will examine how individuals experience migration, and how the manner of entry into the United States impacts one's migrant experience. Course topics will include immigrant admission, deportation, US citizenship, and integration at the national, state, and local levels.  By the end of this course, students will have a good understanding of the U.S. immigration system and the various factors that go into shaping immigration policy and practice today. We will utilize journal articles as well as contemporary newspaper articles, governmental reports, and other relevant documents. Students will be encouraged to discuss current events and relate them to class material and demonstrate how law, policy and theory impact real-world events. 

Taught in English.

This is a hybrid class, meeting in person on the Mason Square campus on Tuesdays and online on Thursdays.

SOCI 395/GLOA 45/GOVT 319

10:30 am - 11:45 am

T

Mason Square campus: Van Metre Hall 311

Michele Waslin (P)

 

10:30 am - 11:45 am

R

ON LINE

Michele Waslin (P

 

IV: Internship in Your Major (6 credits)

You will engage in a 6 credit internship on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays over the course of the semester, totaling at least 270 hours of work.

Talk with your major advisor about how these internship credits can count toward your major requirements.